Gauge Pressure

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On Sunday, 17 January, 2016 11:48 PM, Wrote: Chris Toomer 
 

Hi, First, LOVE the product. I tell everybody about them. I am writing an article for our Honda Goldwing Club Newsletter and am having difficulty understanding the tire pressure. On my 'Wing, Absolute Pressure reads 35.8. When I switch to Gauge pressure, it goes up about 3psi to 38.6. Everybody in my club that has them complains they read low. Can you help me explain to them what is happening. NOTE: We live at 5000 to 6000 feet above sea level in Colorado. Thank you. Chris 

 
On Sunday, January 17, 2016 9:45 AM 
Sameer Thakur <sameer@salutica.com.my>

Dear Sir,

Thanks for writing in to us.

Please take note, Gauge pressure is the additional pressure in a system relative to atmospheric pressure. If you observe a difference in the tire pressure reading at high altitudes, this is because FOBO measures in  absolute pressure minus 14.7psi (equal to gauge pressure at sea-level) and is not affected by the change of atmospheric pressure. On the other hand normal handled gauge measure gauge pressures which is affected by the change of atmospheric pressure  will show higher reading than a FOBO at high altitude.

We recommend that you continue to inflate your tires at the recommender pressure based on the readings shown on FOBO. If you want to see the gauge pressure reading then you can also enable it by going to settings and choose enable gauge pressure..

For Colorado where the altitude level is 6,000 feet. Kindly follow the below chart showing how the altitude difference affects the pressure reading.

 

Altitude (ft.)

Air Pressure (psi)

Sea Level

14.7

1,000

14.2

2,000

13.7

3,000

13.2

4,000

12.7

5,000

12.2

6,000

11.7

7,000

11.3

8,000

10.9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 If the altitude is 6,000 feet then the air pressure will be 11.7 psi. Which means a handheld gauge will show 14.7 – 11.7 = 3 psi higher than the Fobo sensor, which is exactly what you reported. If you follow the handheld gauge, your tires will be underinflated by the same corresponding 3 psi, which is not ideal in the long run.


Hope this clarifies,


Best Regards,

 


On Sent: Saturday, 14 November, 2015 5:38 AM, From: rjoffre

Under the bike profile is Gauge pressure enable/disable Setting. The setting is not in the manual. Could you please tell me what the purpose is for?

Thanks Ron Joffre


On 11/13/15 at 6:45 PM, Sameer Thakur wrote:


Dear Sir,


Thanks for writing in to us.

Referring to your query my answer is as below:

GAUGE PRESSURE - Gauge pressure is the additional pressure in a system relative to atmospheric pressure

So if you observe a difference in the tire pressure reading at high altitudes , this is because FOBO bike measures in absolute pressure and is not affected by the change of atmospheric pressure. On the other hand normal handled gauge measure gauge pressures which is affected by the change of atmospheric pressure. Therefore handled gauge will show higher reading than a FOBO tire at high altitude.

To cut a long story short, Fobo bike  has quite a number of customers who reside in high altitude city like Denver, and these customers are dead set in believing their handheld pressure gauges all their lives, and has problem believing or understanding absolute pressure principle, and refuse to accept Fobo altitude-compensated reading. They want to have an option to continue reading what they are used to, and that is why we provided a gauge pressure reading to appease them, until they come to term with absolute pressure knowledge! Overtime, we are seeing transformation and more and more people wrote back and told us they now understand the difference. Just for your info, in case you are confused on the necessity of this gauge pressure, when all you need is the absolute pressure of Fobo sensors.

We recommend that you continue to inflate your tires at the recommended pressure based on the readings shown on FOBO tire. If you want to see the gauge pressure reading then you can also enable it by going to settings and choose enable gauge pressure..

This does not consume more battery. Do feel free to feedback for further clarification.


Best Regards



On 14 Nov 2015, at 09:00, rjoffre <rjoffre> wrote:


Thank you for the information, it's very clear and straightforward. I absolutely now have a complete understanding of gauge pressure.

Thanks again Ron Joffre